April Connections Legislative Brief

  • Posted on: 10 April 2019
  • By: AMSN

Title 8 nurse workforce development programs are threatened by significant budget cuts, and AMSN and its members are taking action. In its 2020 budget, the Administration recommended cutting Title 8 by two-thirds. Joining forces with the Nursing Community Coalition, AMSN signed on to testimony to Congress supporting $266 million in funding for Title 8, stating, “Nursing Workforce Development programs help meet this demand by connecting patients with care across a variety of settings, including in community health centers, hospitals, long-term care facilities, local and state health departments, schools, workplaces, and patients’ homes.” AMSN President Robin Hertel, EdS, MSN, RN, CMSRN, said, “We are deeply concerned that the Administration's 2020 budget proposes deep cuts to nurse workforce development, health care quality research, nursing research, and coverage important to our patients. This budget proposal is a first step in a long process. We look forward to continuing work with our members, other nursing organizations and coalitions, and members of Congress from both political parties to support policies and funding that advance patient access to high quality, affordable health care.” And AMSN members are contacting Congress today – have you? Take action now, here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1exr1Me48UjtfS0qF7u_IfqQZayJ2efXaJVkU...

AMSN is making medical-surgical nursing’s voice heard by testifying to the National Academy of Medicine’s kickoff meeting of the Future of Nursing 2020-2030 project in Washington. In her statement March 20, AMSN immediate past president Linda Yoder, PhD, MBA, RN, AOCN, FAAN, said, “To the extent that health financing and policy are barriers to health and health care delivery, we recommend transforming the health care payment system so that nurses are not only a cost but a source of revenue and a resource for solving community health needs. Paying for outcomes and value, and ending laws that keep nurses from practicing to the extent they are educated, can improve care and address challenges in nurse staffing.” Learn more about the project here: http://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd/Activities/Workforce/futureofnursin... , see the webcast here: www.nationalacademies.org/hmd/Activities/Workforce/futureofnursing2030/2... and read Dr. Yoder’s statement here: http://amsnblog.org/node/16#overlay-context=node/22

Thousands of women who served their country in uniform as cadet nurses during World War II would be recognized by Congress if legislation newly introduced April 3 is enacted. The “United States Cadet Nurse Service Corps Recognition Act” (HR 2056 / S 997) would designate individuals who served in the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps between July 1, 1943 - Dec. 31, 1948, as veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces active military service, authorize recognition of their discharge as honorable, and render them eligible for burial benefits via the Veterans Administration. It authorizes the Secretary of Defense to produce and award an appropriate U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps service medal. It does not extend them health care or pension benefits otherwise offered through the Veterans Administration. AMSN will formally express support for this legislation shortly as it did in 2018. (Images courtesy United States Government Printing Office via UNT Digital Library)

AMSN advocacy listens to members! In the 2018 AMSN member advocacy survey, the top health policy issue solutions out of ten were these:

“Systems intended to improve health care by addressing social determinants of health and improved monitoring of people with chronic conditions should include med-surg nurses in significant leadership roles.” 40% of respondents said it ranked among their highest priorities, 17% among their lowest.

“To promote patient safety, policy should support translational research into staffing management models that ensure excellent care.” 37% highest, 25% lowest

“Leading AMSN members should be nominated and named to key health policy leadership and advisory panels to ensure med-surg nursing perspective on important issues.” 37% highest, 17% lowest